First_floor_dining_room_Courtesy_of_Local_360

If you’re one of many Pacific Northwesterners who call Seattle home, chances are your personal lexicon contains an abundance of food-focused buzz words; phrases like “farm-sourced,” “locavore,”  and “sustainable.”  The concept of eating local has been spotlighted by everyone from Frank Bruni of The New York Times to the cast of “Portlandia” (whose mockery of conscious eating is searingly funny and spot-on). Regardless of who’s talking, the message remains the same: what you put on your plate matters.

In Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood, no one abides by this principle better than Chef Mikey Robertshaw of Local 360. Located on 1st and Bell in the company of bars, boutiques, and other businesses catering to the young and elite, Local 360 represents the best in farm-sourced food. Robertshaw’s manifesto (proudly displayed on their website) emphasizes simplicity:

“Nothing we are doing is innovative or new — on the contrary, we are returning to a simpler way of functioning as a business.  We have stopped asking, ‘what is new,’ and have begun asking, ‘what is best.'”

Braised_Bacon_with_Porcini__Mushrooms_English_Peas_Fingerling_Potatoes_and_Spring_Onion_Courtesy_Local_360

Best, in this case, refers to the beef, grains, brews, and spirits that are sourced within a 360 mile radius of Seattle. From Golden Glenn Creamery in Bow, Washington to Frank’s Produce in Pike Place Market and fair-trade beans roasted in Seattle by Caffe Vita, everything on the menu here—with the exception of select ingredients that must be sourced further from home—is as local as it is tasty. Libations pay homage to Seattle’s neighborhoods (the Greenlake Margarita or the Cap Hill Cosmo are perfect sips for summer), and entrees are designed for every appetite. Savory small plates include Crab Bisque with fresh basil and the customer-hailed Poutine with beef belly gravy and cheddar fondue. Heartier fare includes the Butcher’s Grind House Burger with cheese and bacon or the Vegetable Risotto with mushroom, asparagus, and parmesan. And be sure to ask the waiter for seasonal specials like the Braised Bacon dish pictured above.

The space itself has a contemporary farmhouse vibe, with high ceilings, fresh table flowers, and wood paneled walls. Gather and feast with friends at a large table, or cozy up in a nook-styled booth for two. However you choose to dine, it’s worth showing up between 3pm and 6pm Monday through Friday when you can sample more than a dozen happy hour plates ranging from $2 to $8. And don’t fret: if you’re chained to the desk past 6, happy hour kicks off again at 10pm.

Once you’re feeling full and happy, congratulate yourself on supporting the local farmers who helped fill your belly, and head directly next door to The Mercantile. This storefront—which celebrated its grand opening on June 21st—is the retail counterpart to Robertshaw’s restaurant. Here you can stock your pantry with ingredients used in the Local 360 menu. Chat with Ben Frey, the in-house butcher serving up cuts of Heritage Farm meats, or check out the selection of sauces, baking mixes, and wines and bring some local flavor home to your kitchen!

Local 360
2234 1st Ave
Seattle, WA 98121
(206) 441-9360
www.local360.org